(Source: mysimpsonsblogisgreaterthanyours, via birdycreatures)

ppeaces:

hey you know my airline’s motto, 2013
foam, mirror, paper

ppeaces:

hey you know my airline’s motto, 2013

foam, mirror, paper

(via lofticries)

halseeon:

Same

halseeon:

Same

(Source: snakerij)

free-parking:

Fragment of the face of a queen, yellow jasper, c. 1353–1336 B.C. Middle Egypt

free-parking:

Fragment of the face of a queen, yellow jasper, c. 1353–1336 B.C. Middle Egypt

(via musashi-no-kami)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The hummingbird has long been admired for its ability to hover in flight. The key to this behavior is the bird’s capability to produce lift on both its downstroke and its upstroke. The animation above shows a simulation of hovering hummingbird. The kinematics of the bird’s flapping—the figure-8 motion and the twist of the wings through each cycle—are based on high-speed video of actual hummingbirds. These data were then used to construct a digital model of a hummingbird, about which scientists simulated airflow. About 70% of the lift each cycle is generated by the downstroke, much of it coming from the leading-edge vortex that develops on the wing. The remainder of the lift is creating during the upstroke as the bird pulls its wings back. During this part of the cycle, the flexible hummingbird twists its wings to a very high angle of attack, which is necessary to generate and maintain a leading-edge vortex on the upstroke. The full-scale animation is here. (Image credit: J. Song et al.; via Wired; submitted by averagegrdy)

(via biovisual)

artpropelled:

Xavier Mascaro

artpropelled:

Xavier Mascaro

(via hrvst)

visualgraphc:

Jack Vanzet: Abstract 7

visualgraphc:

Jack Vanzet: Abstract 7

(via nihilisme)



Mon oncle d’amerique (Alain Resnais, 1980)

Mon oncle d’amerique (Alain Resnais, 1980)

(Source: communicants, via amenomibashira)

regardintemporel:

Jorge Cáceres

regardintemporel:

Jorge Cáceres

(via nativefunkk)

(Source: cosempliciebanane, via theshinysquirrel)

(Source: vrban, via theshinysquirrel)

virtual-artifacts:

Cranes and Serpents, 475-221 BC, China, reportedly from Hunan province, Changsha, Warring States period (475-221 BC), State of Chu (c. 1046-223 BC)

Lacquered wood with polychromy, Overall - h:132.10 w:124.50 cm (h:52 w:49 inches). Purchase from the J. H. Wade Fund 1938.9

(via memor-and-um)

domsebastian:

Dom Sebastian

domsebastian:

Dom Sebastian

(via bataleur)

manufactoriel:

by Ryan Halliwill

manufactoriel:

by Ryan Halliwill

(via manufactoriel)

badesaba:

The Prophet with Hasan and Hossein his veiled figure is seated leaning against a cushion cradling Hasan and Hossein in his arms
Qajar Persia, mid-19th c. - Oil on stretched canvas

badesaba:

The Prophet with Hasan and Hossein 
his veiled figure is seated leaning against a cushion cradling Hasan and Hossein in his arms

Qajar Persia, mid-19th c. - Oil on stretched canvas

(via interspeciesinternational)